Somali

The Somali is a long-haired Abyssinian cat. The breed appeared spontaneously in the 1950s from Abyssinian breeding programs when a number of Abyssinian kittens were born with bottle-brush tails and long fluffy coats. Abyssinians and Somalis share the same personality (active, intelligent, playful, curious) and appearance. The only difference between them is the fur length and therefore the amount of grooming required. Unlike most long-haired cats, Somalis shed very little excess hair. Their coat is generally shed en masse, or “blown”, once or twice a year, rather than constantly shedding like a Persian or other long-haired cat.
Somali long-haired Abyssinian cat
Somali. Long-haired Abyssinian cat
Somalis have a striking, bushy tail, which, combined with their ruddy coat, has earned them the nickname of “fox cats” in some circles. In addition to the fluffy tail, the Somali breed features a black stripe down its back, large ears, a full ruff and breeches, contributing further to the overall “foxy” look. Their coats are ticked, which is a variation on tabby markings, and some Somalis may show full tabby stripes on portions of their bodies, but this is seen as a flaw, and tabby Somalis are only sold as neutered pets. The only tabby marking on a show Somali is the traditional tabby ‘M’ on the middle of the forehead. Like Abyssinians, they have a dark rim around their eyes that makes them look like they are wearing kohl, and they have a small amount of white on their muzzles and chins/throats. White elsewhere on their bodies disqualifies them from show-status. Contents Temperament They are smart and lively, but also alert and curious. They are freedom-loving and must have plenty of room to roam and explore. They are best kept indoors or in outside runs for their own safety. Colors and Patterns There are four main Somali colors officially accepted within the United States: ruddy, red, blue, and fawn. European Somali organizations have a different naming convention: “Usual” for ruddy and “sorrel” for red. European Somali clubs also promote various silver colors. Genetic problems In the 1990s, many purebred Somalis had significant dental problems due to congenital problems magnified by inbreeding. As a result, many Somali cats had to have all their adult teeth removed. (Dental abscesses, especially below the gumline, can cause cats to stop eating, which often leads to hepatic lipidosis, a condition that’s often deadly.) As of 2006, the CFA breed standard makes no mention of this, and breeders say they’ve made much progress in breeding out this unfortunate trait.

Cornish Rex

The Cornish Rex has no hair except for a fine down. Most breeds of cat have three different types of hair in their coats: the outer fur or “guard hairs”, which is about 5 cm long in shorthairs and 10cm+ long in longhairs; a middle layer called the “awn hair”; and the ‘down hair’ or undercoat, which is very fine and about 1 cm long. Cornish Rexes only have this undercoat and thus only lose a few of these very fine hairs at a time. They don’t shed like many other cat breeds.
Cornish Rex..not from Egypt or the outer reaches of our galaxy either
The coat of a Cornish Rex is extremely fine and is the softest fur of any cat breed. However, their light coat means that they are best suited for indoor living in warm and dry conditions. Consequently, these cats tend to hang around the warmest places they can find in the house (you know … the tops of computer monitors, under strong lamps and on top of radiators..that kind of thing). Some Cornish Rexes also have a mild cheesy smell peculiar to the breed; this odour comes from scent glands in the paws (cheese on toast anyone:)) Often the breed referred to as the Greyhound of the cats, because of the sleek appearance and the galloping run characteristic of the breed. Some Cornish rexes like to play fetch, race other pets, or do acrobatic jumps. The Cornish Rex is an adventurous cat and is very intelligent. It can readily adapt to new situations and will explore wherever it can go, jumping into refrigerators, examining washing machines, etc. Some humans consider its antics to be deliberately mischievous. The Rex is extremely curious, seeks out the company of people and is friendly towards other companion animals. It is a suitable pet for timid children. Origin The Cornish Rex is a genetic mutation that originated from a litter of kittens born in the 1950s on a farm in Cornwall, UK; hence the first part of the breed’s name. One of the kittens, a cream-colored male named Kallibunker, had an extremely unusual, fine and curly coat; he was the first Cornish Rex. The owner then bred Kallibunker back to his mother to produce 2 other curly-coated kittens. The male, Poldhu, sired a stunning female called Lamorna Cover who was later brought to America and crossed with a Siamese, giving the breed their long whippy tails and big ears.
cornish rex
Cream & White Tabby Cornish Rex
The Devon Rex looks similar in appearance to the Cornish Rex, but has guard hairs and sheds. The Devon Rex mutation is different than the Cornish Rex mutation in that the Devon has shortened guard hairs, while the Cornish Rex lacks guard hairs altogether. Crosses between Devon and Cornish Rexes are not permitted in pedigrees and matings between them will not produce a cat with short wavy fur. Another hair-deficient breed is the Sphynx cat, which has no hair but may have a very light coat of fuzz. Despite some belief to the contrary, the Cornish Rex’s short hair does not make it non- or hypo-allergenic. Most people who have cat allergies are allergic to cat dander and cat saliva. Since Cornish Rex cats groom as much as or even more than ordinary cats, a Cornish Rex cat will still produce a reaction in people who are allergic to cats. However, because of the fine, light fur that is shed from these cats, people with only mild allergies may experience fewer or no symptoms with a Rex. Using the word “Rex” to imply curly or otherwise unusual fur originates from an occasion when King Albert I of Belgium (1875-1934) entered some curly-haired rabbits in a rabbit show. They did not meet the breed standard, but the show’s officials did not wish to risk offending the king by rejecting them. Instead, they accepted them but wrote “Rex” (Latin for “king”) beside their names.

Colorpoint Shorthair

Colorpoint Shorthair is the name the Cat Fanciers Association (CFA), a United States breed association, uses to refer to pointed cats of Siamese ancestry and type in colors other than the four “traditional” Siamese colors (seal, chocolate, blue, and lilac point). This name is also given to cats of Siamese ancestry in the four recognized colors whose eight generation pedigree show ancestors with other colors. In registries of other countries, however, “Colorpoint (or “Colourpoint”) is the name given to cats of Persian type and pointed coloring, as in Himalayans.
Colorpoint. …not a breed in its own right but part of the Siamese breed
In the CFA, a Colorpoint Shorthair cat may also be any of the four traditional Siamese colors; however, they may only be shown in the red point (also called flame point in Persian Family) or cream point, or any of the above colors in tabby point (also called lynx point) or tortoiseshell point. In all registries except CFA, the Colorpoint Shorthair is not considered a separate breed but is included in the Siamese breed.

Thanks and Credits for ‘Moggyblog’

Here is a list of credits for the site. For sources of information I have visited many sites on the world wide web. Also many of the cats we have kept have come from the Cat Protection people. As always if you would like to contribute any information to the resources on these pages this would be most welcome. You would be credited with this if you so wish. Thank You.
Clearly, with so many cat types and so little time, I’ve had to dip in to existing resources which detail the different cat breeds and their histories.

[1] Wikipedia.com https://en.wikipedia.org

Wikipedia are my prime source of information. So thanks to you guys at ‘Wikipedia’. By the way each of their articles has a full references section so you can look into the reference even deeper if you so wish.

[2] Cats Protection. https://www.cats.org.uk/

We’ve had a number of cats from this organisation, who do a great job. If you want to provide a loving home to a stray or unwanted cat (in the U.K) then please visit this website and look for a branch near you.

Finally, much love and thanks to all the cats we’ve owned and loved in the past.. Including Freddie, Jingles, Tiger, Pudding, Podgy (a dog – cover your ears lads!),Gingerbread and Norman. Thanks pals,… you’ll all be sadly missed and fondly remembered always.

Burmese

The Burmese is a breed of domesticated cats split into two subgroups: the American Burmese and the British Burmese. Most cat registries do not recognise a split between the two groups, but those that do formally refer to the type developed by British cat breeders as the European Burmese. The Burmese was first recognized as a distinct breed in America in 1936 by the Cat Fanciers’ Association. Owing to the extensive breeding with Siamese cats that had been used to increase the population, the original type was overwhelmed and registration was temporarily dissolved during the 1940s. The breed was recognized by the UK Governing Council of the Cat Fancy in 1952. In 1953, after years of selective breeding, Burmese cats in America once again conformed to type and were recognized.
Burmese Cat
The Birmese Cat. “..vocal like the Siamese but have softer, sweeter voices”
Originally, Burmese cats were exclusively brown (sable), but years of selective breeding have produced a wide variety of colours. Different associations have different rules about which of these count as Burmese. Burmese cats are known for being sociable and friendly with humans, as well as intelligent. They are very vocal, and often call to their owners. Throughout the modern history of Burmese, there has been much breeding with Siamese leading to such give-aways as blue or green eyes in the normally yellow-eyed breed. In fact, the Tonkinese cat is a now-recognised cross between Burmese and Siamese.

Characteristics.

The Burmese is considered a foreign shorthair in the United States. Accepted eye colour for the breed is gold or yellow, although interbreeding with Siamese may lead to blue or green. The coat is known for being glossy, with a satin-like finish. As with most short-hairs, it requires no additional grooming. The shape of the British breed is more moderate but must not be Oriental, while the American breed is sturdier in build. Longer lived than most pedigree cats, they often reach 16 to 18 years of age. Burmese are vocal like the Siamese but have softer, sweeter voices. They are people oriented, forming strong bonds with their owners, gravitating toward all human activity. The CFA breed information on the Burmese implies that all survival instinct of flight or fight seems to have been bred out of them. However, other sources note that, while rarely aggressive with humans, Burmese cats tend to be able to defend themselves quite well against other cats, even those larger than themselves. Burmese maintain kitten interests and energy throughout their adulthood and are very athletic and playful. In some instances they even retrieve items as part of a game. Although all cats are obligate carnivores, some Burmese will sample fruit and vegetables. Continue reading “Burmese”